View of campgrounds from hiking trail looking towards I-86

Massacre Rocks State Park sits right along I-86 in Idaho and is nestled into a canyon along the Snake River. Is is named after an Indian skirmish with two pioneer emigrant trains in 1862 and sits along the Oregon and California Trails. The State Park is easily accessible from the interstate and provides 2 campgrounds (upper and lower campgrounds), a Visitor Center, boat launch, Disc Golf, hiking trails, fishing, and canoe and kayak rentals.  The upper campground provides great views down to the Snake River and the surrounding countryside and has plenty of big rig sites but is close to I-86 therefore there is traffic noise. The lower campground also provides terrific views but the noise is considerably less. We stayed in the lower loop and did not hear any traffic at all. We loved this place.

 

Campground: Massacre Rocks State Park
Location: west of American Falls, Idaho just north of I-86
Site: 29 (back-in in the lower campground)
Cost: $38.92 (includes reservation fees and tax)
Services: W/E (30AMP)
Comments: We love this campground. Our site was very unique, had lots of privacy, and terrific views.

 

The lower campground has 2 cabins for rent intermixed with 21 campsites.  The campsites were of various sizes and had both back-ins and pull-thrus.

 

The upper campground also has 2 cabins along with 21 campsites with both back-ins and pull thrus. Both campgrounds were easy to get in and out of and easy to navigate even though they are tiered and set on the side of the hill.

 

The state park offers multiple hiking trails, boat rentals, and disc golf all within range of the campground.

 

The Visitor Center has both indoor and outdoor exhibits and even offered a rattlesnake talk while we were there.

 

One of the hiking trails leads to old wagon ruts along the Oregon Trail/California Trail which were created from the emigrants in the 1800s.

 

About 2 miles from the state park entrance is the national historic site of Register Rock where many of the emigrants carved their names in the rock. It is now a protected by a shelter and a fence. It includes a day use area with picnic tables.